Antarctic Photo Editing Tips In Photoshop and Lightroom with Julieanne Kost

by Lex van den Berghe

posted on 02-14-2017

Travel presents an incredible opportunity to flex your photography muscles, and no one delivers the goods quite like our own Julieanne Kost. Longtime Photoshop and Lightroom Evangelist, Julieanne recently had the opportunity to spend a few days in Antarctica, and she returned with an impressive portfolio featuring the chilly landscape.

On her approach to photography, Julieanne says, “It’s important to know what you can do in post when shooting. While we aspire to capture all of the key elements to make a successful image in camera (light, gesture, composition etc.), post processing is another tool that can be used to craft and refine your vision, and if you can pre-visualize what an image can become, you have an advantage.” Like many photographers, Julieanne uses Lightroom and Photoshop to reinforce her visual narrative, and today we’re lucky to have Julieanne give us a true behind-the-scenes look at her editing process and share a few of her secrets. I’ll let Julieanne take it from here in her own words. Be sure to follow the links for more in-depth tutorials.

Creating Color Contrast with Local Adjustments

LIGHTROOM

Adding Light After-the-Fact

In a perfect world, we would have the time and equipment necessary to light our subject exactly the way that we want to, but in the field, there are often obstacles like time constraints, weight restrictions for equipment, small spaces etc. In these less-than-ideal situations, we move forward doing what we can with what we have, confident we can still shape and form our vision in post-processing.

LIGHTROOM

Pre-Visualizing a Photo for Post

Lightroom and Photoshop allow me more freedom with my photography. Even when I know an image isn’t going to be perfect straight out of the camera, I can pre-visualize what I can create after-the-fact.

LIGHTROOM

PHOTOSHOP

Prepping for Compositing while Shooting

When shooting, if I see a problem I want to fix in a landscape, I always try to capture the element that I will use to fix it. For example, in this image, I thought I might want to bring focus to the iceberg by removing the mountains. With this in mind, I took several additional photographs of the sky (with the same direction and quality of light) to use as my source material to cover the mountains. Because the mountains are a relatively large area, if I had tried to copy info from the original file, you might see repeating patterns. Or, if I had scaled the sky from the original image to cover the mountains, the difference in size and structure of the noise would have been a telltale sign of manipulation.

LIGHTROOM

PHOTOSHOP

Compositing an Image in Photoshop

One of the images that I was really looking forward to making was an over/under shot in the water. However, the algal bloom made the water too murky to see through so I created my own interpretation by compositing multiple images together.

PHOTOSHOP

Using Boundary Warp in Lightroom

LIGHTROOM

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Topics: Design

Products: Lightroom, Photoshop, Creative Cloud